Posted by: Esmé | January 26, 2008

Iraq War Body Count – January 2008

Iraqi Civilian Deaths –
Opinion Research Business (ORB) poll conducted August 12-19, 2007 estimated 1,220,580 violent deaths due to the Iraq War. A nationally representative sample of 1,499 Iraqi adults answered whether any members of their household (living under their roof) were killed due to the Iraq War. 22% of the respondents had lost one or more household members. ORB reported that “48% died from a gunshot wound, 20% from the impact of a car bomb, 9% from aerial bombardment, 6% as a result of an accident and 6% from another blast/ordnance.”


The Iraq Body Count (IBC) figure of 80,419 to 87,834 civilian deaths reported in English-language media (including Arabic media translated into English) up to 10 January 2008 includes civilian deaths due to coalition and insurgent military action, sectarian violence and increased criminal violence. The IBC site states: “it should be noted that many deaths will likely go unreported or unrecorded by officials and media.”For the 4th year of the war between 20 March 2006 and 16 March 2007 the Iraq Body Count reported approximately 26,540 civilian deaths. Iraqi Security Forces (Aligned w/Coalition) -2003-2004: 1,300 police & 453 soldiers killed
2005: 1,497 police & 1,082 soldiers killed
2006: 1,481 police & 627 soldiers killed
2007: 2,017 police & 432 soldiers killed
2008: 63 police & 24 soldiers
Total: 6,358 police and 3,466 soldiers killedMedia and Aid Workers – 112 journalists, 40 media support workers, and 95 aid workers have been killed. Totals as listed at source pages on 25 September 2007.

U.S. Armed Forces – 3,921 dead. 8,691 wounded – medical air transport required. 19,970 wounded – no medical air transport required. Of all the wounded 12,912 were unable to return to duty within 72 hours. Medical air transport was required for an additional 7,963 for non-hostile injuries, and for 22,222 for diseases or other medical conditions. Totals as listed at source pages on 10 January 2008.

Coalition Armed Forces (other countries) – 307 total deaths. Breakdown: Australia 2. Bulgaria 13. Czech Republic 1. Denmark 7. El Salvador 5. Estonia 2. Georgia 1. Hungary 1. Italy 33. Kazakhstan 1. Latvia 3. Netherlands 2. Poland 23. Romania 3. Slovakia 4. South Korea 1. Spain 11. Thailand 2. Ukraine 18. United Kingdom 174. Totals as listed at source pages on 10 January 2008.

Contractors – At least 933 deaths between March 2003 and July 3, 2007. 224 of those are from the USA. Contractors are “Americans, Iraqis and workers from more than three dozen other countries.” 10,569 wounded or injured. Contractors “cook meals, do laundry, repair infrastructure, translate documents, analyze intelligence, guard prisoners, protect military convoys, deliver water in the heavily fortified Green Zone and stand sentry at buildings – often highly dangerous duties almost identical to those performed by many U.S. troops.” 182,000 employees of U.S.-government-funded contractors and subcontractors (118,000 Iraqi, 43,000 Other, 21,000 U.S.).

Insurgents (Anti-Coalition Forces) –

  • 2008: 334
  • 2007: 6,308 (according to the news sources 6,420 killed)
  • 2006: 3,605 (according to the news sources 1,728 killed)
  • 2005: 2,769 (according to the news sources 1,709 killed)
  • 2004: 6,661 (according to the news sources 3,894 killed)
  • 2003: 565 (according to the news sources 328 killed)

In addition as of January 21, 2008 approximately 1,406 suicide-bombers have also been reported killed, see full list.

  • 2008
    • January 2008: 18
  • 2007: 441
  • 2006: 297
  • 2005: 478
  • 2004: 140
  • 2003 (from August to December): 32

Grand total: 15,819-21,648 insurgent dead

Refugees – As of November 4, 2006, the U.N. High Commissioner on Refugees estimated that 1.8 million Iraqis had been displaced to neighboring countries, and 1.6 million were displaced internally, with nearly 100,000 Iraqis fleeing to Syria and Jordan each month.

TOTAL HUMAN BODY COUNT: ~ 121,000 people dead.

* All units measured in humans

** Sources: Wikipedia, IBC, DOD

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